Class Powers Revised: More choices for everyone!

Class powers are a central way for a character to define themselves in Let Thrones Beware. Today’s post is look at how I’m revising how players select class powers
for the next playtest.

Old and Busted

A few weeks ago I ran the first playtests for Let Thrones Beware; one of the issues that came up was that players felt constrained. Each class provided two combat powers and one non-combat power, and this combined with a background which gave the opposite. All told, though each character had six powers, in practice, people found that to be too limiting.

(Another tester observation: class/background power assignment meant that every character with the same class and  background combination would possess exactly the same toolkit).

It was very obvious from feedback that a new approach was required. A new approach to ensure that characters are interesting to make and fun to play. Player advancement wasn’t covered in our first playtests, though it had always been the plan that as a character advanced in experience, she or he would gain more power options. What this meant was that there was already a body of unpublished class powers.

Which in retrospect made for a rather obvious solution.

New and Shiny

First, I split classes into two archetypes (for rogue, as an example, there is one archetype that focuses on traps and one on feints). Each of these archetypes automatically provides a character with a default power that highlights the archetype’s intent. Plus, five power additional options that can be selected during character creation and later on as players advance.

Second, I increased the number of combat powers with which a character begins play. Now everyone gets to choose three additional class powers above and beyond the default and the one provided by the background. Players may select from all the optional available powers to their class (including powers from the other archetype, with the exception of the other archetype default power).

Finally, a character receives a special capstone power only available to their archetype when she or he reaches the end of a tier. Presto, classes are immediately more distinct and far more interesting for players to choose between when creating a character. Plus, there’s another benefit: two characters with the same class will now play differently.

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